While we still expect reliability and room to grow to be high on the list of features outlined in our top-recommended email hosts, there are other variables to consider when evaluating a niche service. We like to see hosts include a complimentary domain name registration and free email accounts. The ability to host unlimited domains on one account is a plus, as are unlimited storage, bandwidth, and email allowances. Our favorite hosts for email, listed below, capitalize on these points while offering other email-friendly features such as IMAP/POP3 support, spam filtering, and integration with Google Apps.

In a nutshell, the web host serves up webpages when someone types yourdomain.com into a web browser, whereas an email host owns the server from which content is fetched when an email is sent to [email protected] The line between email and web hosting has become blurred in recent years, as more providers offer combo packages that include free hosting for your email accounts with the purchase of a web hosting plan. Fortunately, the roles and responsibilities happening behind the scenes are actually pretty straightforward. Your website, domain, and related email accounts are three separate entities that can live in different places.
Usually a single machine placed in a private residence can be used to host one or more web sites from a usually consumer-grade broadband connection. These can be purpose-built machines or more commonly old PCs. Some ISPs actively attempt to block home servers by disallowing incoming requests to TCP port 80 of the user's connection and by refusing to provide static IP addresses. A common way to attain a reliable DNS host name is by creating an account with a dynamic DNS service. A dynamic DNS service will automatically change the IP address that a URL points to when the IP address changes.[10]

For email, security starts with spam, otherwise known as unsolicited email. This is often the bane of not only those who live in their email inboxes,but also of the IT administrators who manage email services. The good news is that spam filters are getting better every day and email providers tend to deploy the very latest and greatest for their customers. The bad news is that these filters still aren't perfect, which means they can catch a lot of "good" email but often vary significantly in effectiveness. Today's spam filters are based largely on machine learning (ML) as the primary method of determining what's bound for the trash bin. Given that ML gets more effective over time, it is no surprise that the services that have been around the longest tend to have better spam detection.
How quickly do web pages load? Speed is an important consideration. Time-to-first-byte (TTFB) is a server-specific criterion, and Google recommends 200 milliseconds, particularly for mobile. Many economy hosting platforms provide this measurement in seconds rather than milliseconds, which is pretty telling. (As a comparison, a human eye blink is typically 100-400 milliseconds.)
We liked how Web Hosting Hub describes its new customer process. They tell new customers, "We walk you through setting up your account in a personal on-boarding call." The company has a few other wins as well. They offer an all-SSD infrastructure, automatic vulnerability patches and a custom firewall, SSH access for certain plans, free site migration and an excellent 90-day money-back guarantee. 
Boy, I wish I had read this article a few years ago. I stupidly used my domain’s email address for another website’s login and 4 years down the road (domain is long gone) I now need to access that email to log into this other site and delete it. I am tempted to re-purchase the domain again and see if I can create the same email address and perhaps be able to log back into the other site? Does anyone know if this would work?
Data protection is another key email security concern. Inboxes often contain GBs of business-critical and personal data, so not just hackers but also legitimate marketing companies can make big money off mining email data—and this sometimes includes the very company that is providing the email service to you. Fortunately, most companies, including your hosting provider, are pretty good about keeping out of private data, but it's important to be aware of when these policies have failed. Security breaches are commonplace and it's important to know how your data is being managed. To protect yourself, be sure to inquire about data safety capabilities on the provider's side, especially around encryption and malware scanning. But be sure to implement additional measures on your side, as well, including encryption for those using local email clients as well as deploying personal virtual private networks (VPNs) to folks accessing their email from multiple locations.
Usually a single machine placed in a private residence can be used to host one or more web sites from a usually consumer-grade broadband connection. These can be purpose-built machines or more commonly old PCs. Some ISPs actively attempt to block home servers by disallowing incoming requests to TCP port 80 of the user's connection and by refusing to provide static IP addresses. A common way to attain a reliable DNS host name is by creating an account with a dynamic DNS service. A dynamic DNS service will automatically change the IP address that a URL points to when the IP address changes.[10]
What about the time you clicked on that PayPal link that wasn't really a PayPal link? "Phishing" is a term applied to either websites or emails that pretend to be something they're not in hopes of getting a user to click on something they should have ignored. This tactis is done in hopes of then getting users to provide confidential information they would have otherwise kept to themselves, typically like passwords, financial information, or other personal data. While there are security measure that fight this, the mechanics behind phishing are, unfortunately, also consistently becoming more sophisticated. Even some dedicated antivirus and business-class hosted endpoint protection suites are having trouble keeping up.
Regardless of when you transfer, you will keep the remaining time left on your domain’s registration. The cost of your domain transfer will add an additional year of registration after the domain’s expiry date. For example, a domain transferred on October 1, 2015 that is set to expire on January 15, 2016 will now expire on January 15, 2017. This will be the case for most top-level domains, however there are a few exceptions that will not apply an additional year. Check with your particular TLD’s registry to see what their domain transfers policy is.
The cloud certainly makes delivering email to your users easier but, for the vast majority of organizations, there's still going to be some setup required beyond simply activating the service. At a minimum, a domain must be purchased and configured to point to the new email host. The service provider can make this process very simple or they can make quite hard; this is something you should watch for in the provider's customer support forums as well as in our reviews. In most cases, there is a validation phase that will require some technical familiarity, though a few providers go so far as to walk even neophyte users through it step by step. Other solid services bolster excellent support with tutorial articles and videos that also walk you through the process. The worst will leave you to figure it out on your own.

Data protection is another key email security concern. Inboxes often contain GBs of business-critical and personal data, so not just hackers but also legitimate marketing companies can make big money off mining email data—and this sometimes includes the very company that is providing the email service to you. Fortunately, most companies, including your hosting provider, are pretty good about keeping out of private data, but it's important to be aware of when these policies have failed. Security breaches are commonplace and it's important to know how your data is being managed. To protect yourself, be sure to inquire about data safety capabilities on the provider's side, especially around encryption and malware scanning. But be sure to implement additional measures on your side, as well, including encryption for those using local email clients as well as deploying personal virtual private networks (VPNs) to folks accessing their email from multiple locations.


Unlike shared or VPS hosting, dedicated hosting makes your website the lone tenant on a server. To extend the housing metaphor, having a dedicated server is like owning your own home. The means that your website taps the server's full power, and pays for the privilege. If you're looking for a high-powered site—an online mansion for your business—dedicated hosting is the way to go., That said, many dedicated web hosting services task you with handling backend, technical issues, much as homeowners have manage maintenance that renters generally leave to their landlords.
cPanel is a Unix based web hosting control panel that provides a graphical interface and automation tools designed to simplify the process of hosting a web site. cPanel utilizes a 3 tier structure that provides functionality for administrators, resellers, and end-user website owners to control the various aspects of website and server administration through a standard web browser.
One of the most important compatibility factors to consider with email is the mobility question. How often do your employees need to access email via mobile devices? That's an important issue because most email hosting providers deliver some kind of web client usable as a default inbox. Almost all of these can be accessed via a mobile device, so if your employees don't need to access their emails on the road that much, then such mediocre clients are probably fine.
In my current VPS setup our server has 6 unshared IP addresses, and it’s running its own mail server. I figured life was good. Until my email started bouncing. It turns out that someone on my network is a spammer, and I got tarred by the same brush because someone on the network was a spammer. As an aside, the server is on a class A subnet, so there are 16 million unique IP addresses in play. The chances are high that someone will be a spammer and will get me blacklisted.
One great way to protect data is by using email encryption. This feature can do wonders for protecting your organization's privacy and that of your employees, but it demands some investigation when you're selecting your provider. Is it built-in or do you require a third-party tool? Does it use common standards that the recipient can process? What about Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) certificates? Are they included or do they need to be purchased separately? The best-in-class tools will not only make encryption easy for anybody to configure and use, buy they'll also make it easy for you to understand pre-purchase.

Just to follow up, we’ve been testing our own email server on a Linode cloud server using Mail In A Box install of Postfix, Dove, etc. Incoming works great. But I’m not all that in love with the outgoing server. So we have been testing the SMTP2GO.COM service and it works well. They have a free plan (no time limit) that lets you send 1000 emails a month are no more than 20 per hour. For $45 a year you can move up to 2,000 a month and no hourly limit. Works well. (Usual disclaimers apply… we are not a reseller… or have any other connection with them beyond using their free service… but we do plan to move to the higher paid limit if all continues to go well.)

FatCow's web host services are served by two Boston-area data centers. Combined, they occupy over 2400 square feet of space, comprised of over 800 Servers and half a petabyte of storage … and growing, fast! Our network infrastructure is comprised of a pooled server environment, which gives virtually any server on our network the ability to access Web site files when a request occurs. This means that the first machine available will be the one to serve a customer's Web pages, giving our customer incredibly fast load times and fewer service interruptions than our competition.
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