Glad I found this post. We’ve been having some email trouble with our web host. We love our host, but it doesn’t look good for a tech support company to have issues with their own email. Getting an email from a client saying their emails to you bounced, is not a good thing! I’m looking forward to solving the problem once and for all. 🙂 I’m just glad we caught the problem before it gets out of hand.

I’d suggest calling (or emailing) Hover and explaining your situation and see what they suggest. As I recall, they don’t allow multi-account access (i.e. you manage client accounts via your login), but we can always cross our fingers that it’s on the roadmap. Alternatively, you could set up accounts in their name/email and just use their logins (don’t tell anyone I said that). 😉

In terms of what many vendors call unlimited service, Web Hosting Pad's terms of service indicate that their definition of unlimited is what they call "incremental." Basically, as you need more capability, they want to discuss that with you, both to help you get the most out of their services, and to make sure you're using their systems without abusing them.
Glad I found this post. We’ve been having some email trouble with our web host. We love our host, but it doesn’t look good for a tech support company to have issues with their own email. Getting an email from a client saying their emails to you bounced, is not a good thing! I’m looking forward to solving the problem once and for all. 🙂 I’m just glad we caught the problem before it gets out of hand.
Years ago I owned a bakery. In the early days we had a survey of customers to see what they’d like us to do. One note made me smile. The person said the price we were charging for bread was outrageous! He’d baked bread, he knew how much it cost. We shouldn’t charge more than 25 cents a loaf! Of course, he wasn’t considering the cost of his time, the cost of staff time (he had none at home), the cost of utilities, the cost of ingredients, and the cost of rent.
I acknowledge your point from a budgetary perspective, but Hostgater is a web host first (and one could argue the quality of that). They’re not primarily an email host. To use a metaphor, why would you get your hair cut from the guy who mows your lawn? If email is a mission-critical component to a business, it should be handled with a professional service.

If you're not sure of the type of hosting your business needs, you might want to start small, with shared Web hosting. You can always graduate to a more robust, feature-rich package of, say, VPS hosting or even dedicated hosting in the future. Unfortunately, some hosts don't offer all hosting types. Consider how much you expect to grow your website, and how soon, before you commit to anything longer than a one-year plan. It's worth spending the time up front to make sure that the host you select with is able to provide the growth you envision for your site, as switching web hosting providers midstream is not a trivial undertaking.
While most businesses will have such suites in place, it often falls to the email service to provide an additional layer of anti-phishing and anti-malware protection. Our reviews found a surprising variance in this department, however, ranging from very robust to completely non-existent, so be careful. Since it's such a huge liability for business owners, this could be one of the most important factors in terms of background features. At the very least, it's better than filing an insurance claim or outright losing funds due to simple social engineering tactics.
Glad I found this post. We’ve been having some email trouble with our web host. We love our host, but it doesn’t look good for a tech support company to have issues with their own email. Getting an email from a client saying their emails to you bounced, is not a good thing! I’m looking forward to solving the problem once and for all. 🙂 I’m just glad we caught the problem before it gets out of hand.

Until 1991, the Internet was restricted to use only "...for research and education in the sciences and engineering..."[1][2] and was used for email, telnet, FTP and USENET traffic—but only a tiny number of web pages. The World Wide Web protocols had only just been written[3][4] and not until the end of 1993 would there be a graphical web browser for Mac or Windows computers.[5] Even after there was some opening up of internet access, the situation was confused until 1995.[6]

[…] This is the company that hosts your emails. This may be the same company that manages your Domain Name or you may use Google Apps or Yahoo Business Mail. It is best to have your emails hosted by a different company than your website, mainly so that if your website hosting goes down, then you still have access to your emails and it means that you won’t experience email downtime if you change website hosts. Carrie Dils explains more in her post ‘Know what’s a terrible idea? Mixing hosting with email.’ […]
When it comes to server operating systems, Linux is typically the default option. Still, some services offer a choice of Linux or Windows hosting. If you have specific server-side applications that require Windows, such as SQL Server or a custom application written in .NET, then you need to make sure your web host has Windows hosting. But don't let the idea of a Linux host intimidate you. Nowadays, most web hosts offer a graphical interface or a control panel to simplify server administration and website management. Instead of typing at the command line, you'll click easily identifiable icons.
This is something we harp on a lot here at HostingAdvice: Free isn’t always a good thing in the world of web hosting. While it’s human nature to search for the free option first, you’re likely to be disappointed by the limited server space, nonexistent support personnel, and obnoxious onsite advertising if you take that route. That’s why we typically encourage coughing up a few measly dollars per month for quality (see below). However, there are a select few providers, including 000webhost and x10hosting, that actually offer decent free hosting services. Our #1 pick for free hosting with email accounts, however, is listed below. Click the links to check out our review.
I was using a shared hosting account for email and web services through JaguarPC (http://www.jaguarpc.com). For $4.95 a month, I was getting email, hosting 6 mailing lists and hosting 5 web sites. 1 on WordPress, 1 legacy site on Doomla!, 3 straight HTML sites. Among other things, I sell cookbooks which I deliver via email. (I’m told I’d save myself a lot of trouble by using the Easy Digital Downloads plugin. I’m told it’s good, comments from users are invited.) But the bottom line is, I need email incoming and outgoing to be able to do business.
No affiliation here other than as a customer – but wanted to say I am very happy with Rackspace ‘cloud’ email so far, for my clients. One master account, as many domains as needed and 25G mailboxes for $2 per month (min $10 monthly fee). DKIM enabled, and they have a nice set of customized instructions for the client which tells them how to set up their outlook, mobile phone, etc. I love not worrying about email now. When I reach a threshold (forgot what it is…) I will qualify for “reseller” status at a discount.
As nice as it would be to never have a problem with your website or the server it’s located on, sometimes things happen. When something goes wrong, is customer service available quickly? How fast can they get you back up and running? Are they even in your time zone? Can you stand in their hallway and ask questions about your site? (Don’t laugh, it happens.) There is a high incentive to keeping your customers happy if you are going to see them at the @SWINChamber meeting on Friday!
Uptime is the percentage of time that a web site is working. For example, if some host has an uptime average of 99.86%, this means that your site will be down for a total about 1 hour each month. We monitor uptime of customer websites of many web hosts and we display this data on the host's details page. Some hosts also offer "uptime guarantees" but this is not as valuable as it might appear
Almost all the services offer some sort of drag-and-drop website builder that makes it easy to drag and drop items to build your page. These are great for getting started, but they often lock you into the service. Most page builders are proprietary to the service, or don't create HTML that's portable enough to be easily moved to another service if you decide it's necessary.

Rounding out the wins, InMotion offers a full 90-day money-back guarantee. On top of that, here's a special money-saving hint. In a chat session confirming pricing and offerings, the operator offered me some special prices and deals that reduced the published price by a few bucks. I was also told that while promotional pricing does go up at the end of the offer period, if you contact customer service, InMotion has a "loyal customer discount" that may bring the price back down.


Great article Carrie! Another nice benefit of separating mail hosting from web hosting is that it opens up a lot of web hosting options. Right now my site is on a Digital Ocean droplet. $10/m for my own 1 core, 1 Gb RAM, 30 Gb SSD VPS. It’s actually a lot more horsepower than I need for my site, at shared host pricing. I can manage web server admin stuff, but mail server admin stuff? No way. I gladly pay Google $5/month to manage the mail server side.


Most companies will prefer a third-party solution since not only will these be more capable, they'll also be supported more effectively by related back-end apps, such as mobile device management (MDM) platforms and mobile-oriented endpoint protection solutions. You'll also have an easier time pushing a third-party platform out to registered client devices, though some hosted email providers can help with this step.
But your service provider isn't your only worry. If you've opted for any third-party email integration, like combining your email with a third-party customer relationship management (CRM) provider (such as Salesforce), that opens your company's email up to either data-snooping apps deployed by Salesforce or to any data breaches that originate with that service. So the more informed you can be about what's attached to your email service, how that data's being used and accessed and especially by whom, the better off you'll be when it comes time to send confidential email.
The availability of a website is measured by the percentage of a year in which the website is publicly accessible and reachable via the Internet. This is different from measuring the uptime of a system. Uptime refers to the system itself being online. Uptime does not take into account being able to reach it as in the event of a network outage.[citation needed] A hosting provider's Service Level Agreement (SLA) may include a certain amount of scheduled downtime per year in order to perform maintenance on the systems. This scheduled downtime is often excluded from the SLA timeframe, and needs to be subtracted from the Total Time when availability is calculated. Depending on the wording of an SLA, if the availability of a system drops below that in the signed SLA, a hosting provider often will provide a partial refund for time lost. How downtime is determined changes from provider to provider, therefore reading the SLA is imperative.[11] Not all providers release uptime statistics.[12] Most hosting providers will guarantee at least 99.9% uptime which will allow for 43m of downtime per month, or 8h 45m of downtime per year.
Also known as a Virtual Private Server (VPS), divides server resources into virtual servers, where resources can be allocated in a way that does not directly reflect the underlying hardware. VPS will often be allocated resources based on a one server to many VPSs relationship, however virtualisation may be done for a number of reasons, including the ability to move a VPS container between servers. The users may have root access to their own virtual space. Customers are sometimes responsible for patching and maintaining the server (unmanaged server) or the VPS provider may provide server admin tasks for the customer (managed server).
Until 1991, the Internet was restricted to use only "...for research and education in the sciences and engineering..."[1][2] and was used for email, telnet, FTP and USENET traffic—but only a tiny number of web pages. The World Wide Web protocols had only just been written[3][4] and not until the end of 1993 would there be a graphical web browser for Mac or Windows computers.[5] Even after there was some opening up of internet access, the situation was confused until 1995.[6]

You want your web host to proactively monitor and apply security updates to your Content Management System (CMS), themes, and plug-ins. If you have to contact your web host to trigger these kinds of updates, the health of your site could be in jeopardy. No matter what, you should follow your web hosting company on Twitter to see if they send out any maintenance announcements.

I was on vacation in Cancun with some girlfriends. We’re talking the kind of vacation where I’m enjoying cocktails before noon, books on the beach, and just the right amount of conversation with friends. I didn’t bring a computer, didn’t have an international plan on my phone, and only had access to wi-fi for 30 minutes a day – plenty of time to message my husband, glance through my work email, and scroll through Facebook.


This day and age, I use MFA on any web-based account. Having you identity stolen is not any fun, and I travel a LOT and I HAVE to use whatever wireless service I can find at time (airport, coffee shop, etc) to get business done when I just can’t reply to the email on my phone adequately without fat fingering too many words on my phone and still sound professional. I have MFA on my social media accounts and banking apps as well. If I sign up for a frequent whatever card, I make sure that I sign up on the website and register the account so that someone else can’t.

Hosted email often comes as part of another service, such as web hosting or Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS). Since that means there will be many extras available with these services, it's inescapable that you'll be paying for those extras in some way. Purchasing them usually means a slight uptick in that per-user price. Many businesses find that, once they're done selecting all of their needed "optional extras," their end price can often reach as high as $10 or more per user. This can start to add up for larger teams. It's somewhat like buying cable service: sometimes you need to pay for the channels you don't want to get the couple of channels that you need. There is also the old adage that "you get what you pay for" when it comes to quality. This is almost always true when considering an email host.
Mike makes a good point. You always have to weigh the entities of cost, time, and value. Take the small company that has a need for 28 email boxes for all of their domains and workers and contractors. Assume $15 per month per box… $15/mo x 28 boxes x 12 months = $5,040. To a small company that’s real money! If that company has better than average technical skills… well at least enough to run their own servers, is it worth $5K to run a mail server for the company? Again, it is a judgement call and not everyone will make the same decision.
Thanks for this post Carrie. I’ve been trying to figure out how to use the email that “comes with” the hosting plan, without using the terrible webmail platforms. I don’t have the correct language, as I haven’t been really keeping up with the internet world for about 10 years now. I’m glad I know it’s a bad idea now. We have the legacy GSuite and I’m wondering if it’s worth it to upgrade, cause we need more space. So I was thinking am I double paying by not using my hosting? Glad to hear it’s a good idea to keep email and hosting separate.
Examples of this include things such as instant messaging (IM) and team chat tools, video conferencing software, online meeting collaboration tools, shared team intranet sites, and more. Some even integrate with third-party tools such as Slack, a highly popular collaboration tool that combines customizable chat "channels" with file sharing and project management. For those who want to integrate with certain apps more deeply or integrate with custom-developed apps they have built in-house, many bigger-name email services will provide robust application programming interfaces (APIs) that will let your in-house developers or consultants deliver on those needs. They will need to be involved in the email service selection process, however, as this is an important consideration during your evaluation period.

That's a big difference, with "inbox zero" requiring an email client with great archiving that works over multiple device types. Meanwhile, at the other end of the spectrum, the personal information managers need something more like Microsoft Outlook, with excellent search capabilities as well as a good storage contract on the hosting side because these types of inboxes are often tens of gigabytes (GB) per user.
9, 75,000. This is the search result for “cheapest hosting”. Do you also choose a hosting provider in the same way? Having a relationship with a hosting provider is lot like online dating. In order to have a successful relationship, you cannot just go for the cheapest hosting provider or the first person you meet … Continue reading 11 Essential Questions to Ask When Choosing Hosting Provider →
Glad I found this post. We’ve been having some email trouble with our web host. We love our host, but it doesn’t look good for a tech support company to have issues with their own email. Getting an email from a client saying their emails to you bounced, is not a good thing! I’m looking forward to solving the problem once and for all. 🙂 I’m just glad we caught the problem before it gets out of hand.

While all the hosts atop our email hosting reviews tout reliable security features, SiteGround and InMotion lead the market when it comes to secure email hosting. As you’re comparing hosting plans, look for words like IMAP or POP3, SPAM filtering, virus protection, and 24/7 server monitoring. SiteGround and InMotion Hosting offer all of the above, whether you’re shopping for business or pleasure.
For more business-oriented customers, they offer a full range of VPS and cloud hosting, along with serious Java Tomcat hosting, including shared and private JVMs, as well as Java VPS offerings. With a company named MochaHost, you'd expect some quality Java support and they have it. So brew yourself a cuppa, open a browser window, and give MochaHost a spin. You have half a year to make up your mind, so if it turns out MochaHost really isn't your cup of tea, they'll understand.
Boy, I wish I had read this article a few years ago. I stupidly used my domain’s email address for another website’s login and 4 years down the road (domain is long gone) I now need to access that email to log into this other site and delete it. I am tempted to re-purchase the domain again and see if I can create the same email address and perhaps be able to log back into the other site? Does anyone know if this would work?
You gain the most web-building functionality if you create a self-hosted site. This typically involves transfering the free WordPress CMS to server or signing up for a web host's optimized WordPress plan. With an optimized plan, the host automatically handles backend stuff, so you don't have to worry about updating the plug-ins and CMS, and enabling automatic backups. In these instances, the WordPress environment typically comes pre-installed on the server.
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