Many web hosting companies include backups in their package, but read the fine print. A good web host will back up the database and file system on a regular basis. So ask: What is the provider’s policy on backups? Is a robust backup plan available? Is this considered a “premium” backup package? Just as important as the backup, what is their policy on restoring your site from that backup? Free backups with no ability to restore your website after it’s hacked is not a good deal. A hosting provider that treats this as an add-on is one that is more interested in their bottom line than yours.
The user gets his or her own Web server and gains full control over it (user has root access for Linux/administrator access for Windows); however, the user typically does not own the server. One type of dedicated hosting is self-managed or unmanaged. This is usually the least expensive for dedicated plans. The user has full administrative access to the server, which means the client is responsible for the security and maintenance of his own dedicated server.

I think it was well said to refer to email as a primary source of communication. To me, its very interesting how much people will invest in a good ISP or telephone company, but balk at email hosting. I am currently in those stables trying to get done shoveling the dung, but since our dedicated server has been extremely bullet proof, it’s be difficult to convince the higher ups.
I acknowledge your point from a budgetary perspective, but Hostgater is a web host first (and one could argue the quality of that). They’re not primarily an email host. To use a metaphor, why would you get your hair cut from the guy who mows your lawn? If email is a mission-critical component to a business, it should be handled with a professional service.
I acknowledge your point from a budgetary perspective, but Hostgater is a web host first (and one could argue the quality of that). They’re not primarily an email host. To use a metaphor, why would you get your hair cut from the guy who mows your lawn? If email is a mission-critical component to a business, it should be handled with a professional service.
We liked how Web Hosting Hub describes its new customer process. They tell new customers, "We walk you through setting up your account in a personal on-boarding call." The company has a few other wins as well. They offer an all-SSD infrastructure, automatic vulnerability patches and a custom firewall, SSH access for certain plans, free site migration and an excellent 90-day money-back guarantee. 
Email isn't going away any time soon. Despite a rise in adoption of collaboration-based communication platforms such as Microsoft Teams or Slack, 86 percent of professionals prefer to use email for business purposes. How companies host, store, and distribute their email—that's the area that has undergone a massive transformation. Businesses are veering away from costly onsite email servers running products such as Microsoft Small Business Server and looking instead to the cloud with hosted email solutions. Businesses of all sizes have realized the wisdom of going with a scalable and secure hosted Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) solution with guaranteed uptime that breaks down pricing into flexible, per-user charges.
If you’re a startup or a small- to medium-sized business, iPage offers low-cost options that are great for small or growing companies on a budget. With your free domain name registration, you get hosting for unlimited domains and emails, plus $150 in free advertising credits, should you need to market a new website as well. The host’s email tools include webmail, autoresponders, email forwarding, and security features like SPAM filters and virus protection.
Allows clients to become web hosts themselves. Resellers could function, for individual domains, under any combination of these listed types of hosting, depending on who they are affiliated with as a reseller. Resellers' accounts may vary tremendously in size: they may have their own virtual dedicated server to a colocated server. Many resellers provide a nearly identical service to their provider's shared hosting plan and provide the technical support themselves.

Alexandra Leslie’s interest in website administration was sparked in her teens, priming her for a fast-paced career in managing, building, and contributing to online brands, including HostingAdvice, Forbes, and the blogs of prominent hosting providers. She brings to the table firsthand experience in reviewing web hosts, perfecting website design, optimizing content, and walking site owners through the steps that add up to a successful online presence. Today, she combines her extensive writing experience with technical understanding to unpack some of the most complex topics that daunt novice website owners, as well as the subjects that excite veteran technologists within the HostingAdvice readership.


Thanks for this post Carrie. I’ve been trying to figure out how to use the email that “comes with” the hosting plan, without using the terrible webmail platforms. I don’t have the correct language, as I haven’t been really keeping up with the internet world for about 10 years now. I’m glad I know it’s a bad idea now. We have the legacy GSuite and I’m wondering if it’s worth it to upgrade, cause we need more space. So I was thinking am I double paying by not using my hosting? Glad to hear it’s a good idea to keep email and hosting separate.

That's a big difference, with "inbox zero" requiring an email client with great archiving that works over multiple device types. Meanwhile, at the other end of the spectrum, the personal information managers need something more like Microsoft Outlook, with excellent search capabilities as well as a good storage contract on the hosting side because these types of inboxes are often tens of gigabytes (GB) per user.


The availability of a website is measured by the percentage of a year in which the website is publicly accessible and reachable via the Internet. This is different from measuring the uptime of a system. Uptime refers to the system itself being online. Uptime does not take into account being able to reach it as in the event of a network outage.[citation needed] A hosting provider's Service Level Agreement (SLA) may include a certain amount of scheduled downtime per year in order to perform maintenance on the systems. This scheduled downtime is often excluded from the SLA timeframe, and needs to be subtracted from the Total Time when availability is calculated. Depending on the wording of an SLA, if the availability of a system drops below that in the signed SLA, a hosting provider often will provide a partial refund for time lost. How downtime is determined changes from provider to provider, therefore reading the SLA is imperative.[11] Not all providers release uptime statistics.[12] Most hosting providers will guarantee at least 99.9% uptime which will allow for 43m of downtime per month, or 8h 45m of downtime per year.
BOOM. Asked and answered in just over 1,000 words, give or take some HTML code — how’d I do? If there are any questions lingering in this gray area of a topic, please drop me a line below. If not, hopefully, you’ve found the right service to meet your hosting needs. Sweeten the deal by checking for any online coupons or promotions currently available. Some of the most popular basic hosting discounts are listed below. Click the orange buttons to activate!
You could think of the sites that share your server as your roommates; there's really not that much separating you from them. Sure, you can close the bedroom door, but they can still cause nightmares for you in the kitchen and the bathroom. In web hosting terms, all the sites share a single server's resources, so huge traffic spike on Site A may impact the neighboring sites' performances. It's even possible that another site could take down the shared server altogether, if it crashed hard enough.
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