This day and age, I use MFA on any web-based account. Having you identity stolen is not any fun, and I travel a LOT and I HAVE to use whatever wireless service I can find at time (airport, coffee shop, etc) to get business done when I just can’t reply to the email on my phone adequately without fat fingering too many words on my phone and still sound professional. I have MFA on my social media accounts and banking apps as well. If I sign up for a frequent whatever card, I make sure that I sign up on the website and register the account so that someone else can’t.
Since I didn’t get any real benefit from the VPS and since I never really liked the VPS version of CPanel, I moved my web hosting back to JaguarPC. I recommend both JaguarPC and ServerHub highly, just not for email services. (If you’re looking for a budget hosting service, look at http://lowendbox.com/, they track hosting deals, and rate them as well. They also have better deals for ServerHub than ServerHub offers direct to the public.)
Hosted email often comes as part of another service, such as web hosting or Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS). Since that means there will be many extras available with these services, it's inescapable that you'll be paying for those extras in some way. Purchasing them usually means a slight uptick in that per-user price. Many businesses find that, once they're done selecting all of their needed "optional extras," their end price can often reach as high as $10 or more per user. This can start to add up for larger teams. It's somewhat like buying cable service: sometimes you need to pay for the channels you don't want to get the couple of channels that you need. There is also the old adage that "you get what you pay for" when it comes to quality. This is almost always true when considering an email host.
Similarly, the costs of running your own email server aren’t obvious. If you are running your server in your office, you are at the mercy of your ISP and power company and you have the possible opportunity cost of missed deals. We needed to be 7 x 24 and lost connectivity was a very real issue. The people who sell email services have hardened server sites with 5 nines reliable electricity (with battery and generator backup), as well as 5 nines reliable connectivity.
Most companies will prefer a third-party solution since not only will these be more capable, they'll also be supported more effectively by related back-end apps, such as mobile device management (MDM) platforms and mobile-oriented endpoint protection solutions. You'll also have an easier time pushing a third-party platform out to registered client devices, though some hosted email providers can help with this step.
Running in-house email servers does provide more control and wider customization as well as tracking and compliance for small to midsize businesses (SMB). But they require specialized on-site IT staff as well as the need to manually manage and support both hardware and software. A third-party hosted email service matches many of the advantages of in-house email without the expensive initial investment. The ability to manage the number of users, access the latest security protocols, and enjoy ease of connectivity and deployment of hosted solutions makes it a viable and competitive option.
Many of us own more than one domain, sometimes more than 2 or 3 domains. If you choose hosting provider which allows adding multiple domains then you can accommodate these extra domains. Hence make a domain capacity check before you purchase. Generally, hosting companies allow at least 25 add-on domains* to one account but some web host allows only one domain. So be sure about this before going for purchase.
I asked ServerHub if I should just throw in the towel and use a dedicated email provider. Their tech guy gave me the name of two services, which I took as a hint. Instead, I went with Hover. They’ve handles my registration and DNS services very well. Their email is $2 a month per account, $5 a year for a forwarder and they have very good anti-spam agents. So, I signed up with Hover and got to edit my DNS records yet again.
Why? Because word of mouth only gets you so far in the internet era. People discover new businesses—even local business—via Bing, Google, and Yahoo. The days when they'd just look you up in the yellow pages are long gone. If you don't have a sharable website address, your chances of building online word of mouth via social networking plummet, too. In other words, no website, no discoverability, no money. Of course, web hosting isn't just for businesses. You may want to host a personal website or blog, too. Either way, the services here have you covered.

Many web hosting services offer a low "starting price," but require you to prepay for two or three years of service to get that price. After the promotional period, the renewal price for some web hosting services can be two, three, or even four times the initial promotional pricing. While the initial deal might be incredible, the cost of transferring your site (or paying the added fee) in a couple of years may be something to consider.
The company's entry-point pricing is extremely low, and while this will buy you up to three years of very low-cost hosting, do be aware that its post-promotion price will increase substantially, putting its subsequent year pricing more in line with the rest of its competitors. That said, we liked its 24/7 phone customer support, SSD support on some plans, and 30-day money-back guarantee.
I will agree that their customer service is great as you can speak to a real human, and they are very helpful when you do get them on the phone. However, when you have clients in another country such as Australia Hover’s service is only available during U.S. business hours – something to consider for those that might require either 24-hour support or support during non-US hours.
Elapsed time from the start if the saga – 3 weeks of limited email functionality, 3 weeks of using my gmail account to get around my own server’s issues. I don’t like giving out my gmail account name. (As a hint, I keep it for things like this- when your server is down or blocked it helps to have an unrelated account. Think of it as your fire escape. AND it’s free.)
Your next major concern will be compatibility. It's not a shock that most businesses run on Microsoft Windows and use some form of Microsoft Office. Being able to use common third-party clients such as Microsoft Outlook can often be a concern, and even today, compatibility with Microsoft Outlook isn't necessarily guaranteed. This is especially true when sending and receiving meeting invites. It only takes one garbled meeting invite to realize how frustrating this can be in the real world. Even if using Microsoft Outlook isn't a concern, portability is. If the service is entirely web-based, then is there a means for me to take my email offline and send email when I connect?

One irritation to note about Hover: You have to also host your domain with them. For me, that’s not a big deal since I’m already using them as my domain registrar. However, if you’ve pre-paid for many years of domain registration elsewhere, that’s cash down the toilet if you transfer it to Hover (Thank you, reader Y, for showing me either a new policy or one I hadn’t noticed before).
Everything seemed well on day 1. On day 2, things deteriorated. Beth, my wife, couldn’t send emails to contacts at UNT and a few other institutions from her new Hover account. Heck – I couldn’t send an email to Beth, who now had an account at Hover and was sitting next to me. All attempts to send email garnered a popup telling us the email we were sending was spam or a virus. WTH?
If you require a lot of functionality and versatility from your website, you’ll benefit from programs and applications that can help you build your site. Our Web hosting plans give you access to free, server-side applications that can be used to develop and customize your website, including popular Content Management System (CMS) applications like WordPress® and Joomla!®. You can even add a Dedicated IP if you plan to add an SSL Certificate later.
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